Minnesotans For Sustainability©

 

Sustainable:  A society that balances the environment, other life forms, and human interactions over an indefinite time period.

 

 

 

How CUSP Scores*
 

CUSP Score  =  Conservation/Consumption/Preservation + Immigration + Natural Increase
3

All scored 0 — 100

[MFS note: See Minnesota delegation CUSP Enviroscores here.]

Vote Descriptions

Roll Call votes in C108-1, except as noted

For text of bills and for Congressmembers’ individual votes, see Library of Congress Thomas (Jefferson) legislative information, http://thomas.loc.gov/.

Note that in the great majority of these votes the environmental position lost, often by substantial margins. This in spite of the fact that polls consistently show that the public supports and trusts the positions of environmental organizations.

The objection might be raised that, when Congress-members ("Members") vote on immigration and freedom-of-choice policies, they are not thinking of them as "environmental" votes. True enough. Our answer is that the purpose of the CUSP Scorecard is get them and others to realize that votes that affect future U.S. population numbers are in fact the most important environmental votes. (Consider that it took years for Members to realize that fossil fuel combustion, automobile fuel efficiency, over-use of agricultural chemicals, urban sprawl and many other issues are "environmental" issues.)


Conservation / Consumption / Preservation (C/C/P) C108 - 1st Session 2003

CUSP C/C/P scores are calculated from Roll call votes selected by the League of Conservation Voters (LCV). For more detailed explanations than are quoted here, see the LCV National Environmental Scorecard 2003, February 2004, First Session 108th Congress booklet or <www.lcv.org>.

The symbol "#" designates Roll Call vote number tabulated in Library of Congress Thomas (Jefferson) legislative information at http://thomas.loc.gov/ where the Bill can be read.


Senate (18 points)

1. National Energy Policy, #456, Nov. 21, 2003. A vote to end debate on approval of a House-Senate conference report. "LCV considers the energy conference report to be among the most anti-environmental pieces of legislation in recent history and has chosen to score this vote twice." Environmental vote NO won 57-40 because 60 votes are required to invoke cloture. The report was then removed from consideration in this session.

2. Global Warming, #420, Oct. 30, 2003. S.139, The Climate Stewardship Act, requires reduction in U.S. emission of greenhouse gases to 2000-year levels by the year 2010. Environmental vote YES lost 43-55.

3. Fuel Economy, #309, July 29, 2003. Amendment to S.14, The Senate Energy Bill, to raise the corporate average fuel efficiency (CAFE) standard to 40 miles per gallon by 2015. Environmental vote YES lost 32-65.

4. Arctic Drilling. #59, March 19, 2003. To strike from S. Con. Res. 23 a provision counting revenues from oil drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge in the 2004 budget resolution. Environmental vote YES won 52-48.

5. Forest Fire Policy #428, October 30, 2003. A vote on the Senate version of H.R.1904, the President’s "Healthy Forests" initiative, which would weaken environmental laws and judicial independence regarding logging in the national forests. Environmental vote NO lost 80-14.

6. Defense ESA Exemptions #190, May 21, 2003. An amendment to the Defense authorization bill that would require the Secretary of the Interior to assure that lands owned and operated by the Defense Department were adequately protected before the Endangered Species Act (ESA) could be waived. Environmental vote YES won 58-41.

7. Off-Shore Drilling #221, June 12, 2003. An amendment to S. 14, the Senate energy bill, that, because the testing methods damage sea life and ocean habitat, would strike the requirement that the Interior Department inventory the potential oil and gas resources of the entire Outer Continental shelf. Environmental vote YES lost 44-54.

8. Privatizing the Park Service. #361, September 23, 2003. An amendment to the Interior appropriations bill to prohibit funding for outsourcing studies for the national parks and other land management agencies. Environmental vote YES lost 44-51.

9. Fire Policy — NEPA Waiver. #426, October 30, 2003. A motion to table an amendment to the Senate version of H.R. 1904 to restore the adequate-range-of-alternatives standard required by The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) when conducting environmental reviews of forest thinning projects. Environmental vote NO lost 57-34.

10. Tongass Judicial Review. #359, September 23, 2003. A motion to table a motion to remove an amendment from , H.R. 2691, the Interior Appropriations bill, that would undermine the ability of citizens to file legal challenges to timber sales in the Tongass National Forest. Environmental vote NO lost 52-44.

11. Pryor Nomination. #316, July 31, 2003. A cloture vote to end a Democrat filibuster against the nomination of anti-environmental Alabama Attorney General William H. Pryor to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit. Environmental vote NO lost 53-44 but Pryor’s confirmation failed because 60 votes are required to invoke cloture.

12. New Source Review. #12, January 22, 2003.An amendment to the omnibus appropriations bill to put rule changes on hold which weaken the Clean Air Act as it applies to upgrading older coal-fired power plants. Environmental vote YES lost 46-50.

13. Renewable Fuel Liability Standards. #208, June 5, 2003. An amendment to Senate energy bill,S.14, to ensure that companies remain fully liable for problems caused by renewable fuels and fuel additives. Environmental vote YES lost 38-57.

14. Superfund Tax Reinstatment. #97, March 25, 2003. An amendment to the fiscal year 2004 budget resolution to restore the "polluter pays" fees used to fund the under-funded Superfund program to clean up toxic waste dumps. Environmental vote YES lost 43-56.

15. Nuclear Power Subsidies. #214, June 10, 2003.An amendment to Senate energy bill, S.12, to strike a costly double subsidy to private builders of new nuclear power plants. Environmental vote YES lost 48-50.

16. Devils Lake Project. January 23, 2003. A vote to table an amendment to strip an amendment from the H.J. Res. 2, the omnibus spending bill for fiscal year 2003 which would authorize $100 million for the Corps of Engineers’ controversial North Dakota Devils Lake Project. Environmental vote NO lost 62-35.

17. Yazoo Pumps Project. #23, January 23, 2003. An amendment was introduced to the 2003 energy and water appropriations bill, which was later incorporated into the omnibus appropriations bill, to speed up expenditure on the Yazoo Pumps Project in Mississippi before an environmental impact statement or a feasibility study had been completed. This was countered by an amendment to allow the Corps time to carry out its planning first. This was countered by an amendment to table. Environmental vote NO lost 67-30.


House (19 points)

1. Energy Plan. #145, April 11, 2003. Approval of H.R. 6, based on the President’s energy plan. Environmental vote NO lost 247-175. "LCV considers H.R. 6 to be among the most anti-environmental pieces of legislation passed in recent history and has chosen to score this vote twice to reflect the significance of the issue."

2. Oil Savings. #132, April 10, 2003. An amendment to H.R. 6, the House energy bill, instructing the Department of Transportation to reduce the amount of gasoline consumed by U.S. automobiles 5% by 2010. Environmental vote YES lost 162-268.

3. & 4. Arctic Drilling. 3. #134, April 4, 2003. An amendment to H.R. 6, the House energy bill that would allow extensive damage to the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) while purporting to limit damage. Environmental vote NO lost 226-202.

4. An amendment to H.R. 6 to maintain the prohibition on oil development in the ANWR. Environmental vote YES lost 197-228.

5 & 6. Forest Fire Policy. May 20, 2003. H.R. 1904, the Healthy Forests Restoration Act of 2003, uses the fear of forest fire destruction of property to promote logging of the national forests by eliminating rules and procedures required under the National Environmental Protection Act (NEPA). 5. #198, an amendment to H.R. 1904, that sought to protect homes and communities from the threat of wildfires without undermining public participation and environmental laws. Environmental vote YES lost 184-239. 6. #200, May 20, 2003. Passage of H.R. 2003. Environmental vote NO lost 256-170.

7. Forest Roadless Rule. #386, July 17, 2003. An amendment to H.R. 2691, the 2004 Interior appropriations bill, to prohibit the administration from changing the roadless area conservation rule designed to protect some 58.5 million acres of roadless national forest lands from roadbuilding and most forms of logging. Environmental vote YES lost 185-234.

8. Forest Management Plans. #384, July 17, 2003. An amendment to H.R. 2691, the Interior appropriations bill, to prevent the administration from finalizing or implementing regulation changes to the National Forest Management Act (NFMA) that would fundamentally impair the future of America’s national forests. Environmental vote YES lost 198-222.

9. Defense Environmental Exemptions. #202, May 21, 2003. H.R.1588, the national defense authorization bill, exempts the military from obeying the Endangered Species Act (ESA) and the Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA). A rule was introduced to prevent amending H.R. 1588. Environmental vote NO lost 224-200.

10. Snowmobiles in Yellowstone. #385, July 17, 2003.

An amendment to the 2004 Interior appropriations bill, H.R. 2691 which would uphold the original ban on snowmobiles in Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks and promote access to the park via multi-passenger snowcoach. Environmental vote YES lost on a tie vote of 210-210.

11. Bison in Yellowstone. #383, July 17, 2003. An amendment to H.R. 2691, the 2004 Interior appropriations bill, to prohibit the National Park Service and the U.S. Forest Service from using federal funds to kill bison in and around Yellowstone. Environmental vote YES lost 199-220.

12.. Klamath Wildlife Refuge Farming Leases. #383, July 17, 2003. An amendment to H.R. 2691, the 2004 Interior Appropriations bill, that would prohibit the Fish and Wildlife Service from issuing new commercial agriculture leases in the Klamath basin for crops that have severe environmental impacts, especially on wildlife that depend on the refuge. Environmental vote YES lost 197-228.

13. Offshore Drilling. #540, October 11, 2003. An amendment to, H.R 6, the House energy bill, to instruct energy bill conferees to maintain current moratoriums on new oil leases on the Outer Continental Shelf. Environmental vote YES won 229 -182.

14. Ozone Pollution. #598, October 30, 2003. A motion to instruct H.R. 6/S.14 energy bill conferees to remove language inserted in t he House which drops a provision in the Clean Air Act critical to reducing smog levels. Environmental vote YES lost 182-232.

15. Clean Water Act Exemptions. #618, November 7, 2003.A motion to instruct H.R. 6/S.14 energy bill conferees to reject Clean Water Act exemptions for the oil and gas industry. Environmental vote YES lost 188-210.

16. Anti-Environmental Riders. #31, February 13,2003. A motion to remove from the House 2003 omnibus appropriations bill, H.J. Res. 2, a series of anti-environmental amendments. . Environmental vote YES lost 193-226.

17. Delaware Channel Project. #391, July 18, 2003. An amendment to reduce funding in the 2004 energy and water projects appropriations bill, H.R. 2754, for a faulty project to deepen the shipping channel in the Delaware River. Environmental vote YES lost 194-213.

18. Bike and Pedestrian Trails. #469, September 4, 2003. An amendment to the 2004 Transportation and Treasury appropriations bill, H.R. 2989, that would reinstate the 10% allocation for transportation enhancements including such community-based projects as pedestrian and bicycle facilities, scenic and historic highway programs, historic preservation, and the conversion of unused rail corridors to multi-use trails. . Environmental vote YES won 327-90.


Immigration C108 - 1st Session

CUSP Immigration scores are calculated from Roll Call votes selected by FAIR.


Senate

Because FAIR finds no scoreable Senate Roll Call votes in C108-1, CUSP Senate Immigration scores are "Recent Scores" calculated by Americans For Better Immigration (ABI) from Senators’ actions from the beginning of the 107th Congress in January 2001 through C108 — 1st Session 2003 ABI scores are a good indicator of Senators’ awareness that numbers matter but, unless all ABI evaluations are done in precisely the same way for every Senator, ABI scores and therefore CUSP scores cannot be compared quantitatively against all others. ABI scores are regularly updated on the web at < http://www.betterimmigration.com/reportcardintro.html>.

CUSP Senate immigration scores are ABI Recent Scores dated March 10, 2004 except for Senators Lamar Alexander (R-TN) and Lisa Murkowski (R-AK). ABI did not score them in March 2004 because sufficient data was lacking for them at that time. Those two ABI Recent Scores are dated November 6, 2004.


House

CUSP House Immigration scores are determined by five Roll Call votes selected by FAIR.

1. Regulation of Foreign ID cards. #367, July 15, 2003, H. AMDT. 246 to H.R.1950. Sponsor: Rep. John Hostettler (R-IN). Would authorize the State Department to regulate the issuance of foreign consular ID cards, such as the Mexican matricula consular, in the United States. The FBI and the Department of Justice say that matricula consular cards are not a reliable form of identification and pose "major criminal threats" and a "potential terrorist threat." Hostettler's amendment directs the Secretary of State to issue regulations that would require foreign missions issuing consular ID cards to collect information on every card recipient and make that information available to the State Department. Environmental vote YES won 226-198.

2. Sanctuary Amendment  #409 July 22, 2003, H.AMDT.293 to H.R. 2799. Sponsor: Rep. Tom Tancredo (R-CO). Would prohibit any Department of Homeland Security funds from being allocated to states or localities that refuse to share information with the Bureau of Immigration and Customs regarding an individual's citizenship or immigration status as required by a 1996 law. The amendment was prompted by actions increasingly taken by cities and local jurisdictions adopting non-cooperation ordinances banning local enforcement officials from sharing information with federal immigration authorities. Environmental vote YES lost 122-305.

The following three Roll Call votes in the first half of C108-2 were included in order to provide enough votes to achieve a more meaningful score.

3. Undocumented Alien Emergency Medical Assistance Amendments, #182 May 18, 2004, H.R. 3722. Sponsor: Rep. Dana Rohrabacher (R-CA). Would prohibit federal reimbursement of hospital-provided emergency and certain transportation services to illegal aliens unless the hospital provides the Secretary of Homeland Security with information regarding an alien's citizenship, immigration status, financial data, and employer. The bill would make those who knowingly hire illegal aliens responsible for health care costs incurred, and directs the Secretary to initiate removal procedures against aliens determined to be removable under federal immigration law.

Environmental vote YES lost 88-331.

4. Troops on the Border, #196, May 19, 2004, H.AMDT.532, to H.R. 4200. Sponsor: Rep. Virgil Goode Jr. (R-VA). Would authorize the U.S. Secretary of Defense to assign members of the Army, Navy, Air Force, and Marine Corps to assist the Department of Homeland Security in the performance of border protection functions. Recognizes the need to control our borders better by aiding our outnumbered border patrol to block illegal entry. Environmental vote YES won 231-191 but the amendment was later stripped out during House-Senate conference.

5. Sanctuary Amendment, # 270 , June 18, 2004, H.AMDT.583 to the appropriations bill for the Department of Homeland Security. Sponsor: Rep. Tom Tancredo (R-CO). Would prohibit Department of Homeland Security funds from being allocated to states or localities that refuse to share information with the Bureau of Immigration and Customs regarding an individual's citizenship or immigration status as required by a 1996 law. The amendment was prompted by actions increasingly taken by cities and local jurisdictions adopting non-cooperation ordinances banning local enforcement officials from sharing information with federal immigration authorities. Environmental vote YES lost 148-259.


Natural Increase

C108-1 Actions selected by Population Connection which show Congressmembers’ position on legislation affecting future U.S. natural increase in population. Actions include those indicating whether the Member is Pro-Choice, for comprehensive sex education, for over-the counter emergency contraception and for other policies which tend to make population reduction possible. For details see Population Connection "2004 Congressional Report Card" published in PC Reporter Vol. 35, #4, Winter 2004, <www.pc.org>.


Senate
(6 Actions)

1. Family Planning Availability Package, March 11, 2003. An amendment to S. 3 to expand the availability of family planning information and services. Environmental vote YES won 49-47.

2. Roe v. Wade Resolution, March 12, 2003. An amendment that affirmed the Supreme Court’s decision in Roe v. Wade which legalized abortion and stated that the ruling should not be overturned. Environmental vote YES won 52-46.

3. Abstinence-Only-Until-Marriage Education Program, May 15,2003. A motion to strike a requirement that one-third of HIV/AIDS prevention funds be used to promote abstinence until marriage education in which any discussion of the benefits of contraception is prohibited. Environmental vote YES lost 45-52.

4. Abortions at Overseas Military Facilities, May 22, 2003. An amendment to the FY 2004 Defense Authorization bill (S. 1050) that would give servicewomen and military dependents stationed overseas access to privately-funded abortions at base hospitals, a vote which is an indicator of a pro-choice position. Environmental vote YES lost 48-51.

5. Repeal of the Global Gag Rule, July 9, 2003. "The Global Gag Rule" imposes restrictions on U.S. aid for family planning overseas. These restrictions bar U.S. aid to foreign family planning agencies that use their own private funds to provide abortions or speak out about the issue of abortion. A motion to table an amendment to the FY 2004 State Department Reauthorization bill (S.925) to repeal the Global Gag Rule. . Environmental vote NO won 43-53.

6. Insurance Coverage for Contraceptives EPICC, The Equity in Prescription Insurance and Contraception Coverage Act (S. 1396) requires health insurance plans to include coverage for all prescription contraceptive methods approved by the Food and Drug Administration. Environmental vote credit is given for Co-sponsorship of S. 1396. Number of cosponsors at press time: 23 (23%).


House
(5 actions)

1. Abstinence-Only-Until-Marriage Education, May 1, 2003. A vote on an amendment to the global HIV/AIDS Relief bill (H.R. 1298) to require one-third of HIV/AIDS prevention funds be used to promote abstinence-only education in which any discussion of the benefits of contraception is prohibited. Environmental vote NO lost 220-197.

2. Abortion At Overseas Military Facilities, May 22, 2003. An amendment to the 2003 Defense Authorization bill (H.R. 1588) to give service-women and military dependents stationed overseas access to privately funded abortions at base hospitals, a vote which is an indicator of a pro-choice position. Environmental vote YES lost 201-227.

3. Ban On Safe Abortion Procedures, June 4, 2003. A motion to send the "Partial Birth Abortion Ban" bill (H. R.760) back to committee for further consideration particularly to provide exceptions where a procedure was necessary to protect the woman’s health. Environmental vote YES lost 165-256.

4. Aid to UNFPA, July 15, 2003. A motion to remove funding for the United Nations Population Fund from the 2004-5 State Department Authorization bill (H.R. 1950). Environmental vote NO lost 216-211.

5. Insurance Coverage for Contraceptives (EPICC), The Equity in Prescription Insurance and Contraception Coverage Act (H.R. 2727) requires health insurance plans to include coverage for all prescription contraceptive methods approved by the Food and Drug Administration.

Environmental vote credit is given for co-sponsorship of H.R. 2727. Number of cosponsors at press time: 77 (18%).

[MFS note: See Minnesota delegation CUSP Enviroscores here and  immigration voting records here.]
_____
* Used with permission of CUSP.

Please see original at < http://www.uscongress-enviroscore.org/cuspframes.html >.

 

Please send mail to webmaster@mnforsustain.org with questions or comments about this web site. Minnesotans For Sustainability (MFS) is not affiliated with any government body, private, or corporate entity. Copyright © 2002 Minnesotans For Sustainability